looks philosophical

This is what a philosopher looks like.
I am Bill Edmundson.  I teach at Georgia State.  My primary appointment is in Law but I manage to do some philosophy as well, mainly political philosophy but also moral philosophy more generally.  This is a photo of me and my dog, Niall.  I chose it because Niall can make moral judgments.  He is judging me harshly, here, because I have stopped throwing him his ball.

I am Bill Edmundson.  I teach at Georgia State.  My primary appointment is in Law but I manage to do some philosophy as well, mainly political philosophy but also moral philosophy more generally.  This is a photo of me and my dog, Niall.  I chose it because Niall can make moral judgments.  He is judging me harshly, here, because I have stopped throwing him his ball.

I am Francois Raffoul, with a picture where I am skiing the Matterhorn. I am professor of Philosophy at Louisiana State University. I specialize in continental philosophy, with an emphasis on Heidegger, Derrida and Nancy. I have recently published a book, The Origins of Responsibility, and preparing a new monograph on the event in contemporary thought.

I am Francois Raffoul, with a picture where I am skiing the Matterhorn. I am professor of Philosophy at Louisiana State University. I specialize in continental philosophy, with an emphasis on Heidegger, Derrida and Nancy. I have recently published a book, The Origins of Responsibility, and preparing a new monograph on the event in contemporary thought.


My name is Christina Van Dyke.  I’m an associate prof at Calvin College, and I’m currently the Director of Gender Studies there as well as the Executive Director of the Society of Christian Philosophers.  I work primarily in medieval M&E (focused on the high middle ages—I’m pretty useless past Aquinas) and the philosophy of gender, although I’ve got interests in a lot of other areas as well. I’ve been single parenting for the last decade, which has been both a challenge and a delight.  I’ve traveled all over the world with my son, but a friend took this picture of me in my own driveway.  I chose it because while I don’t usually look traditionally “professional”, I am pretty darn happy (most of the time, anyway)!

My name is Christina Van Dyke.  I’m an associate prof at Calvin College, and I’m currently the Director of Gender Studies there as well as the Executive Director of the Society of Christian Philosophers.  I work primarily in medieval M&E (focused on the high middle ages—I’m pretty useless past Aquinas) and the philosophy of gender, although I’ve got interests in a lot of other areas as well. I’ve been single parenting for the last decade, which has been both a challenge and a delight.  I’ve traveled all over the world with my son, but a friend took this picture of me in my own driveway.  I chose it because while I don’t usually look traditionally “professional”, I am pretty darn happy (most of the time, anyway)!

I’m Rae Langton. I am a professor of philosophy at MIT, in Cambridge, Massachusetts. For various reasons, personal and philosophical, I have also spent time in India, Australia, Scotland and England. With that clue, you might guess where this photo was taken. I work in the history of philosophy, moral and political philosophy, metaphysics, and feminist philosophy. There is no subject like philosophy for letting you think about, and write about, whatever grips you.  I’ve written about many topics, ranging from God, freedom and immortality, to sex, lies, and videotape.  I wouldn’t be where I am without a great deal of concrete support. I’m lucky to have discovered philosophy at a time and place when there were no student fees, and an allowance for those of modest means; lucky to have had encouragement from teachers and friends; and lucky to find family-friendly attitudes and policies among the people and institutions I know. In a close possible world, I am a botanist. In the actual world, I possess the embarrassing talent of recalling names of plants better than names of people.

I’m Rae Langton. I am a professor of philosophy at MIT, in Cambridge, Massachusetts. For various reasons, personal and philosophical, I have also spent time in India, Australia, Scotland and England. With that clue, you might guess where this photo was taken. I work in the history of philosophy, moral and political philosophy, metaphysics, and feminist philosophy. There is no subject like philosophy for letting you think about, and write about, whatever grips you.  I’ve written about many topics, ranging from God, freedom and immortality, to sex, lies, and videotape.  I wouldn’t be where I am without a great deal of concrete support. I’m lucky to have discovered philosophy at a time and place when there were no student fees, and an allowance for those of modest means; lucky to have had encouragement from teachers and friends; and lucky to find family-friendly attitudes and policies among the people and institutions I know. In a close possible world, I am a botanist. In the actual world, I possess the embarrassing talent of recalling names of plants better than names of people.

I’m Bradley Rettler, a 4th year graduate student in philosophy at Notre Dame. I work in metaphysics, and I’m currently writing a dissertation on truthmaking and related notions. When I’m not doing philosophy, I enjoy single malt scotch, rap karaoke, kettlebell workouts, and the NFL. I’m pretty sure that I watch more TV than academics are supposed to watch.

I’m Bradley Rettler, a 4th year graduate student in philosophy at Notre Dame. I work in metaphysics, and I’m currently writing a dissertation on truthmaking and related notions. When I’m not doing philosophy, I enjoy single malt scotch, rap karaoke, kettlebell workouts, and the NFL. I’m pretty sure that I watch more TV than academics are supposed to watch.

I am Milena Ivanova and I am a doctoral candidate in the philosophy department at Bristol University. I specialise in philosophy of science, in particular the conventionalist tradition, the scientific realism debate and the relativized a priori. I am also interested in epistemology, applied ethics and meta-ethics. When I am not doing philosophy, I love playing tennis, experimenting with food, traveling, making jewellery, and most of all going to football and tennis matches. Here, I am at the Emirates to see my team win the Emirates’ Cup (2009).

I am Milena Ivanova and I am a doctoral candidate in the philosophy department at Bristol University. I specialise in philosophy of science, in particular the conventionalist tradition, the scientific realism debate and the relativized a priori. I am also interested in epistemology, applied ethics and meta-ethics. When I am not doing philosophy, I love playing tennis, experimenting with food, traveling, making jewellery, and most of all going to football and tennis matches. Here, I am at the Emirates to see my team win the Emirates’ Cup (2009).

My name is Edward M. Engelmann and I teach at Merrimack College in Massachusetts. I am into what I call philosophy of nature, which compares Classical, Medieval, and non-Western views of nature to those which have arisen with the Scientific Revolution.  This was taken at Easter after a few glasses and there was a beautiful sky. 

My name is Edward M. Engelmann and I teach at Merrimack College in Massachusetts. I am into what I call philosophy of nature, which compares Classical, Medieval, and non-Western views of nature to those which have arisen with the Scientific Revolution.  This was taken at Easter after a few glasses and there was a beautiful sky. 

I’m Heather Logue, a lecturer at the University of Leeds.  I work on philosophy of mind and epistemology.  When I’m not doing philosophy, I enjoy reading fiction (especially sci fi), singing, drinking whisky, and making sure my shirt and socks match.

I’m Heather Logue, a lecturer at the University of Leeds.  I work on philosophy of mind and epistemology.  When I’m not doing philosophy, I enjoy reading fiction (especially sci fi), singing, drinking whisky, and making sure my shirt and socks match.

My name is Thom Brooks. I am Reader in Political and Legal Philosophy at Newcastle University and founding editor of the Journal of Moral Philosophy. My work is in the areas of ethics, law, and public policy with particular interests in British Idealism, Hegel, and all things jurisprudence. I’m originally from New Haven and moved to the UK in 2001 after a few years in Ireland. It has been a long and winding road involving a citizenship test, visa applications, and interviews, but I finally became a British citizen in 2011. My first degree is in music and I enjoy few things more than playing guitar or bass in bands of all styles. I also enjoy travel and picking up peculiar local sayings that I repeat everywhere else I go.

My name is Thom Brooks. I am Reader in Political and Legal Philosophy at Newcastle University and founding editor of the Journal of Moral Philosophy. My work is in the areas of ethics, law, and public policy with particular interests in British Idealism, Hegel, and all things jurisprudence. I’m originally from New Haven and moved to the UK in 2001 after a few years in Ireland. It has been a long and winding road involving a citizenship test, visa applications, and interviews, but I finally became a British citizen in 2011. My first degree is in music and I enjoy few things more than playing guitar or bass in bands of all styles. I also enjoy travel and picking up peculiar local sayings that I repeat everywhere else I go.

I’m Catherine Hundleby, Associate Professor at the University of Windsor, where I work on feminist epistemology and argumentation theory.  Students, staff, and faculty regularly look into my office to see if my husky-mix dog Abbie has joined me that day and to offer her treats and scratches.  She has us all well-trained.  I’ve considered posting office hours for her since people will work their schedules around hers.  

I’m Catherine Hundleby, Associate Professor at the University of Windsor, where I work on feminist epistemology and argumentation theory.  Students, staff, and faculty regularly look into my office to see if my husky-mix dog Abbie has joined me that day and to offer her treats and scratches.  She has us all well-trained.  I’ve considered posting office hours for her since people will work their schedules around hers.  

I’m Steff Rocknak, an Associate Professor of Philosophy at Hartwick College. I specialize in Hume and the philosophy of art. I am also a professional sculptor and I love to ski and bike.

I’m Steff Rocknak, an Associate Professor of Philosophy at Hartwick College. I specialize in Hume and the philosophy of art. I am also a professional sculptor and I love to ski and bike.

I’m Brian Glenney, an Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Gordon College, MA. I work at the intersection of Early Modern Philosophy,  Philosophy of Perception, and Philosophical Psychology. I think a lot about shape perception, sensory integration, and external attribution. 
I think graffiti letters are very interesting. Our ability to recognize these shapes is evidence for thinking that “non-accidental properties,” such as letter corners, and paralleling lines, are the means by which our minds cognize the shapes of objects.

I’m Brian Glenney, an Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Gordon College, MA. I work at the intersection of Early Modern Philosophy,  Philosophy of Perception, and Philosophical Psychology. I think a lot about shape perception, sensory integration, and external attribution. 

I think graffiti letters are very interesting. Our ability to recognize these shapes is evidence for thinking that “non-accidental properties,” such as letter corners, and paralleling lines, are the means by which our minds cognize the shapes of objects.

I’m Christopher Long, Professor of Philosophy and Classics and Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies in the College of the Liberal Arts at Penn State.  My work focuses on Ancient Greek philosophy and 20th century continental philosophy.  

This is a picture of me with my daughters on the “Scrambler” at Idlewild Park in Ligonier, PA. It reminds me to be present to the moment and, whenever possible, to play.

I’m Christopher Long, Professor of Philosophy and Classics and Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies in the College of the Liberal Arts at Penn State.  My work focuses on Ancient Greek philosophy and 20th century continental philosophy.  

This is a picture of me with my daughters on the “Scrambler” at Idlewild Park in Ligonier, PA. It reminds me to be present to the moment and, whenever possible, to play.
I’m Elise Springer, working in ethical theory at Wesleyan University. I take particular interest in the moral significance of communication and socially critical responsiveness. My work is seasoned with pragmatist, feminist, and ecological lines of thought. Here I am taking a snack break with my enthusiastic home-grown philosophical apprentice.

I’m Elise Springer, working in ethical theory at Wesleyan University. I take particular interest in the moral significance of communication and socially critical responsiveness. My work is seasoned with pragmatist, feminist, and ecological lines of thought. Here I am taking a snack break with my enthusiastic home-grown philosophical apprentice.

I’m Christopher Hom, an assistant professor at Texas Tech University and an external research fellow at the Stanford Humanities Center.  At the moment I’m thinking about racial slurs and evaluative language.  I teach mostly philosophy of language, logic, metaphysics, and epistemology.  I also enjoy throwing parties, drinking wine, watching basketball, and being in California.

I’m Christopher Hom, an assistant professor at Texas Tech University and an external research fellow at the Stanford Humanities Center.  At the moment I’m thinking about racial slurs and evaluative language.  I teach mostly philosophy of language, logic, metaphysics, and epistemology.  I also enjoy throwing parties, drinking wine, watching basketball, and being in California.